A HISTORY OF THE THIRD FRENCH REPUBLIC C. H. C. WRIGHT

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Published: September 1st 2013

Kindle Edition

113 pages


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A HISTORY OF THE THIRD FRENCH REPUBLIC  by  C. H. C. WRIGHT

A HISTORY OF THE THIRD FRENCH REPUBLIC by C. H. C. WRIGHT
September 1st 2013 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, talking book, mp3, ZIP | 113 pages | ISBN: | 10.31 Mb

• This e-book is illustrated publication of historical account of the Third French Republic by C.H.C. Wright.• The images have been resized, digitally enhanced and optimized for a Kindle.• A new table of contents with working links has been includedMore• This e-book is illustrated publication of historical account of the Third French Republic by C.H.C. Wright.• The images have been resized, digitally enhanced and optimized for a Kindle.• A new table of contents with working links has been included by a publisher.• This edition has been corrected for spelling and grammatical errors.An excerpt from the beginning of the book:Two men were largely responsible, each in his own way, for the third French Republic, Napoleon III and Bismarck.

The one, endeavoring partly at his wifes instigation to renew the prestige of a weakening Empire, and the other, furthering the ambitions of the Prussian Kingdom, set in motion the forces which culminated in the Fourth of September.The causes of the downfall of the Empire can be traced back several years. Napoleon III was, at heart, a man of peace and had, in all sincerity, soon after his accession, uttered the famous saying: Lempire, cest la paix. But the military glamour of the Napoleonic name led the nephew, like the uncle, into repeated wars.

These had, in most cases, been successful, exceptions, such as the unfortunate Mexican expedition, seeming negligible. They had sometimes even resulted in territorial aggrandizement. Napoleon III was, therefore, desirous of establishing once for all the so-called natural frontiers of France along the Rhine by the annexation of those Rhenish provinces which, during the First Empire and before, had for a score of years been part of the French nation.On the other hand, though France was still considered the leading continental power, and though its military superiority seemed unassailable, the imperial régime was unquestionably growing stale.

The Emperor himself, always a mystical fatalist rather than the hewer of his own fortune, felt the growing inertia of his final malady. A lavishly luxurious court had been imitated by a pleasure-loving capital. This had brought in its train relaxed standards of governmental morals and had seriously weakened the fibre of many military commanders. Outwardly the Empire seemed as glorious as ever, and in 1867 France invited the world to a gorgeous exposition in the Ville-lumière.

But Paris was more emotional year by year, and the Tuileries and Saint-Cloud were dominated by a narrow-minded and spoiled Empress. Court intrigues were rife and drawing-room generals were to be found in real life, as well as in Offenbachs Grande Duchesse. But nobody, except perhaps Napoleon himself, realized how the Empire had declined. The Empress merely felt that it was time to do something stirring, and, without necessarily waging war, to assert again the pre-eminence in Europe of France, weakened in 1866 by the unexpected outcome of the rivalry between Austria and Prussia for preponderance among the German States.Beyond the eastern frontier of France a nation was growing in ambition and power.

Prussia still remembered the warlike achievements of Frederick the Great, although since those days its military efficiency had at times undergone a decline. But now, under the reign of King William, guided by a vigorous minister, Bismarck, an example, whatever his admirers may say, of the brutal and unscrupulous Junker, the Prussian Government had for some time tried to impose its leadership on the other German States.

Some of these were far from anxious to accept it. In the furtherance of Prussian schemes, Bismarck had been able to inflict a diplomatic rebuff on Napoleon, as well as a severe military defeat on Austria.



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